Easy Four Patch Quilt Pattern

 

Easy four patch quilt pattern

Easy four patch quilt pattern

This easy four patch quilt pattern forms a grid along both diagonals with different sized squares.  It is made using squares only – not a half square triangle in sight!  The quilt is a good size, at 74″ square but can easily be made bigger or smaller by using different numbers of four patch quilt blocks.

I have used 1/2 yard each of the white and black floral fabrics, 1/2 yard each of the pink script and green border fabric, 1 yard of the red script and 1.1/4 yards of the pink tulip fabric in the border.  You can buy these fabrics as a kit at 10% discount here.  I am also offering a 12% discount across the whole shop this week (use coupon code XMAS), so in fact your total discount on this kit will be a whopping 22% off the normal fabric price.  Shop here.

Cutting requirements

2.1/2″ squares:  one hundred and twenty eight white floral, one hundred and twenty eight red script. These can be strip pieced, so don’t cut them until you have read the full pattern

4.1/2″ squares:  sixty four red script, sixty four pink script, sixty four black floral

For the borders you will need eight 1.1/2″ strips of green fabric cut across the width of fabric and sixteen 2.1/2″ strips of pink tulip fabric cut across the width

Cut the combined strips at 2.1/2" intervals

Cut the combined strips at 2.1/2″ intervals

Make four patch units

Make four patch units

Making the small four patch quilt blocks

These can best be made by strip piecing.  Sew together a red and a white 2.1/2″ strip along the length.  Press and then cut at 2.1/2″ intervals to make strips 2.1/2″ wide and 4.1/2″ long.

Place these in pairs with one of them rotated so that the red squares are diagonally opposite each other

Make sixty four of these small four patch units.

Layout for the small four patch blocks

Layout for the small four patch blocks

Lay the small four patch units out with two red 4.1/2″ squares to make a full size four patch unit.  Sew the small four patch units together to make one 4.1/2″ square.  Sew each one to a red square and then sew the pairs of squares together to complete the first four patch quilt block.  You will need thirty two of these for the easy four patch quilt pattern.

Layout for the second four patch block

Layout for the second four patch block

Making the large four patch quilt blocks

Lay out two pink 4.1/2″ squares and two black 4.1/2″ squares.  Sew the squares together in pairs and then sew the pairs of squares together to complete the block.  You will need thirty two of these.  I have called this the large four patch quilt block, although it is the same size as the first block – it’s just my way of differentiating between them.

You will need thirty two of these blocks for the easy four patch quilt pattern.

Easy four patch quilt pattern layout

Easy four patch quilt pattern layout

Assembling the easy four patch quilt pattern

Lay the quilt blocks out in eight rows of eight.  Begin the first row with a small four patch block and alternate with the large four patch block across the row.

Begin the second row with a large four patch block and alternate with the small four patch blocks across the row.

Continue alternating the blocks down all eight rows.  Take care when you place the blocks to ensure that the small white squares always follow one diagonal while the large black squares always follow the other diagonal.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

First two borders

First two borders

Quilt Borders

For the first border I have used 2.1/2″ strips of pink tulip fabric.  You will need two lengths of 64.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 68.1/2″ for the sides.

The second border is made using 1.1/2″ strips of green fabric.  You will need two lengths of 68.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 70.1/2″ for the sides.

Third quilt border

Third quilt border

Finally for the third border I returned to the 2.1/2″ strips of pink tulip fabric.  You will need two lengths of 70.1/2″ for the top and bottom of the quilt and two lengths of 74.1/2″ for the sides.

That completes the easy four patch quilt pattern.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

With the festive season approaching, I have decided to hold a sale. I am offering a 12% discount for the next week on all products in the shop – that covers all sections of the shop.

Use discount coupon XMAS to give yourself a 12% discount all week until 10.00pm on Thursday 6th November 2014.

Here’s the video:

I have had a really productive week:  three quilt tops are now layered and ready for quilting.  Minnie, my longarm quilting machine, and I are going to be very busy this weekend!

Writing With Thread

Writing with thread

Writing with thread

Writing with thread is a wonderful way to personalise your project.  The key is to write your message first with fabric marker and to write without lifting your pen so that you will be able to sew without lifting your sewing machine foot.

Draw your straight lines first

Draw your straight lines first

Writing with thread on a straight line

Using fabric marker, draw straight lines first on your fabric.  I find this necessary, though you may feel confident enough to write without a line to keep you straight.

Write your message taking care not to lift your pen throughout each word so that you will be able to keep stitching along the word in one go.

Place your needle immediately above the start of the word on the left and sew carefully over the markings that you have made.  For this I used my free motion quilting foot with quilting thread.  I have stopped the machine and taken the fabric out at the end of ‘Merry’ and started again for ‘Christmas’.  At the end of the word I kept going and quilted a few loops around the bottom of the word.

Writing with thread on a curve

Writing with thread on a curve

Writing with thread on a curved line

You may wish not to write on a straight line and to give a curve I drew two curved lines using a plate to give the shape.  All the same principles apply – make sure that you don’t lift your pen throughout the word.

As you can see, I didn’t centre my words very well, but that’s just poor planning on my part.

Sew loops to get from one word to the next

Sew loops to get from one word to the next

This time, to show you alternatives, I moved from one word to the next by quilting a few loops to get my needle from the end of the first word to the beginning of the second word.

If you want to practise writing with thread and don’t want to draw lines, a good idea is to sew your name several times – because that’s something that you are used to writing so your hands will move more easily along the letters without you having to think too much about it.

I hope that’s given you some ideas on how to personalise your project, particularly with Christmas coming up.  Here’s the video:

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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