Fair and Square Quilt Block

Fair and square quilt block

Fair and square quilt block

The fair and square quilt block is a four patch block attributed to the Kansas City Star.  It’s an easy traditional block and would be great as a scrappy block.  I have made it here as a 12″ square.

Cutting requirements for the fair and square quilt block

3.1/2″ squares:  four pink, eight white

3.7/8″ squares:  two pink, two green

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the fair and square quilt block

Use the 3.7/8″ squares to make half square triangles.  Place a pink and a green square with right sides together and mark a line along the diagonal.  Sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line and cut along the line.  This produces two half square triangles which are now 3.1/2″ squares.  Press the seam allowance towards the green fabric and trim the corners of the squares.

Fair and square quilt block layout

Fair and square quilt block layout

Sew the squares across each row

Sew the squares across each row

Lay the squares out in four rows of four squares.  The pink squares are placed in the corners, with two white squares along the edges between the pink squares.  The half square triangles are all placed in the middle with the pink creating a diamond in the middle of the fair and square quilt block.

Sew the squares together across each row.  In fact, you can see more easily now that there are only two different rows – rows one and four are the same as each other and rows two and three are the same as each other.

You could make the fair and square quilt block as a scrappy block, using many different colours and the corners would make pretty four patch units when the blocks were sewn together in a quilt.  The important part is to use the dark colour around the central diamond and the medium colour for the diamond and the corners.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Double Rail Fence Quilt Pattern

Double rail fence quilt pattern

Double rail fence quilt pattern

The double rail fence quilt pattern for this week’s project is a really easy pattern.  I was tempted to add diamonds round the edges for a border but decided that I was going to keep it absolutely plain and simple.  I hope that this is one that you’ll feel you can run up when you want a quilt really quickly – and it’s striking enough on its own, I think.

The quilt measures 36″ square and I have used less than 1/4 yard of each of ten fabrics with 1/2 yard of white.  As usual, you can buy the fabrics that I used at a 10% discount on this week’s special offer.  Broadly I have selected five fabrics in the red/yellow part of the colour spectrum and five in the blue/green section, going from dark to light.  I have then used white as the sixth fabric for both colour selections.

I made a rail fence quilt with pinwheels in the middle quite a long time ago and you can see how that looks here.

Cutting requirements for the double rail fence quilt pattern

Cut 1.1/2/” strips across the width of fabric – three each in all the blue fabrics and four each in all the red fabrics. You will need seven white strips.

Make four red panels

Make four red panels

Make three blue panels

Make three blue panels

Making the rail fence quilt blocks

Sew together one strip of each colour in each colour selection.  Press the seam allowances from light to dark across each panel.  Make four red panels and three blue panels.

Cut the panels to make squares

Cut the panels to make squares

First three rows of the rail fence quilt pattern

First three rows of the rail fence quilt pattern

Cut the panels at 6.1/2″ intervals to make squares.  That is all that’s required to make the rail fence quilt pattern blocks!  The design is now formed by rotating the blocks while you sew them together in six rows of six.

You will need nineteen red blocks and seventeen blue blocks.

The basic pairing of the quilt blocks is one square with the darkest colour at the top and one square with the darkest colour running down the left hand side.

In row one there is one red pairing, one blue pairing and then one red pairing.

In row two the design is shifted one block to the right.  The first square has the dark blue down the left followed by a red pairing, a blue pairing and then a single red with the red across the top.

In row three there is a blue pairing followed by a red pairing and then another blue pairing.

Rows four to six of the double rail fence quilt pattern

Rows four to six of the double rail fence quilt pattern

Rows four to six continue the rail fence pattern across the quilt.  Row four begins with a single red block with the red on the left.  This is followed by a blue pairing, a red pairing and a single blue with the dark blue on the top.

Row five is a red pairing, blue pairing then red pairing.

Row six is a single blue square with the dark blue on the left followed by a red pairing, blue pairing and then a single red square with the red on the top.

Sew the squares together across each row and then sew the rows to each other to complete the double rail fence quilt pattern.  It is now ready for layering, quilting and binding.  Full details of these steps can be found in the beginner quilting section.

Here’s the video:

I’ve been feeling absolutely exhausted this week – I think all that travelling has caught up with me.  Thank you so much for all your kind comments on my Zimbabwe article.  I haven’t had the energy to make anything with my new African fabric, but I’m hoping to get started on them next week.
Craftsy

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Make half square triangles

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