Drawstring Bag Tutorial

Drawstring bag tutorial

Drawstring bag tutorial

I’ve written this drawstring bag tutorial because during my recent travels I decided that I could do better than using a plastic carrier bag to pack my shoes in.  I have made three of these shoe bags (you’ll see why later) and they are roughly 14″ by 9″.  I’ve made them in two colours which I hope will make it easier to see what I’ve done.

Use your own shoes to decide on size

Use your own shoes to decide on size

Cutting requirements

I’ve used a 9″ strip of two different fabrics cut across the width of fabric.

For the drawstring I needed about 20″ for each drawstring bag.

I used my own shoes to decide on the largest size of drawstring bag that I would need – if you wear shoes with 5″ heels you will obviously need to make a different size.

I decided on a length of 14″ for this drawstring bag tutorial – that way I could cut three bag panels from each width of fabric.

Place fabric with wrong sides together

Place fabric with wrong sides together

Turn wrong side out and sew another seam

Turn wrong side out and sew another seam

Drawstring bag tutorial

In order to make the bags neat and tidy on the inside, I have used a French seam, so the first step is to place two pieces of fabric with wrong sides together.  Sew a 1/4″ seam on three sides, leaving one of the short sides open.

Turn the bag inside out and sew another 1/4″ seam around the same three sides.  This will enclose the raw edges so that you don’t get any fraying inside the drawstring bag.

Turn under a hem on the top of the drawstring bag

Turn under a hem on the top of the drawstring bag

Turn under a small double hem around the top of the bag to enclose the raw edges.  You could either sew this hem by machine or by hand.  I chose machine as it’s quicker.

Add the ribbon to the top of the bag

Add the ribbon to the top of the bag

That’s the shoe bag complete – now it’s just a question of making the drawstring part.

Rather than making a tube around the top of the bag and threading ribbon through it as I did for the plastic bag holder, I wanted a nice feminine touch for this bag.  I’ve used some lace with ribbon already threaded – I’m pretty sure that there is a name for it, but I can’t think what it is.

Completed and filled drawstring bag

Completed and filled drawstring bag

Turn under the raw edge of the lace and pin the lace all round the top of the bag.  Sew both above and below the ribbon to make sure that the lace is fastened securely.

I hope that you’ve found this drawstring bag tutorial helpful – this would also make a great gift bag.  I can think of all sorts of things that I could store in these bags besides my shoes.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

Porto Rico Quilt Block

Porto Rico quilt block

Porto Rico quilt block

The porto rico quilt block looks more complicated than it is.  As so often in quilting, it becomes easy when you look at small sections of it for each step.  I have made it here as a 16″ square.

Cutting requirements for the porto rico quilt block

2.1/2″ squares:  eight red, ten blue

2.7/8″ squares:  two white

4.7/8″ squares:  three red, three blue, five white

Make half square triangles

Make half square triangles

Making the porto rico quilt block

Make half square triangles with two of the red squares with white, and with all three of the blue 4.7/8″ squares with white.

Place a red or blue square right sides together with a white square.  Mark a line along the diagonal and sew a 1/4″ seam either side of the marked line.  Cut along the line to produce two half square triangles.  These are now 4.1/2″ squares.

Outer frame of the porto rico quilt block

Outer frame of the porto rico quilt block

I am going to show the layout for the porto rico block in stages to simplify things.  Place two red and two blue 2.1/2″ squares in each corner to make four patch units.  Note that the red is always in the corner of the block.  Along each edge place one red/white and one blue/white half square triangle.  Check the photo to see which way round to place the red or the blue.

Next stage of the layout

Next stage of the layout

For the inner section of the porto rico quilt block, begin by adding the remaining two blue/white half square triangles in two corners of the inner square.  In the other two corners, place red triangles formed by cutting the 4.7/8″ red square along one diagonal.

Complete layout of the porto rico quilt block

Complete layout of the porto rico quilt block

Cut the two 2.7/8″ white squares along one diagonal to make triangles.

 

Complete the blue/white triangle

Complete the blue/white triangle

Place one triangle on either side of the last two blue 2.1/2″ squares.  Check the photo to see that the white triangles are placed so that together they form a straight line to make one large triangle.  Sew the white triangles to the blue squares to form large triangles and trim the edge where the white triangle tips stick out.

Begin sewing the squares across the rows

Begin sewing the squares across the rows

Sew all the squares in the corners together to form four patch units.

Where possible, within each row sew the half square triangles together.  The four patch units are now the same size as the half square triangles, so the patchwork pieces can now be sewn together in four rows of four.

Finally sew the rows to each other to complete the porto rico quilt block.

As you can see, a fairly complicated looking quilt block has become simple just by looking at the sections in small stages first.

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

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Eccentric star quilt pattern

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Sugar bowl quilt block

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Christmas card holder wall hanging

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Railroad Crossing Quilt

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