How to Make A Puff Quilt Cushion


 

How to make a puff quilt cushion

How to make a puff quilt cushion

I have written about how to make a puff quilt before now for a wall hanging, but it occurred to me that a puff quilt (also known as biscuit quilt) would make a great cushion or seat pad.  This one is 15″ square and is designed for my dining room chair – although it could also be used outside just for sitting on the grass.  If you wanted to make a seat for a garden bench you would just have to make a lot more puffs.

Cutting requirements for a puff quilt cushion

10″ squares:  five red, four blue

5″ squares:  five blue, four red

Two 2″ strips of black fabric cut across the width of fabric for the binding

Stuffing of some sort – I used toy stuffing

Pin the corners of the squares together

Pin the corners of the squares together

How to make a puff quilt cushion

Place a blue 5″ square on a red 10″ square with wrong sides together.  Pin the corners of the blue square to the corners of the red square – yes, I know that they don’t exactly fit together, but this is just the first stage!

Smooth the fabrics towards the middle of the edge

Smooth the fabrics towards the middle of the edge

Flatten the loop down

Flatten the loop down

Beginning at the corners of one edge, smooth the red fabric towards the middle so that the blue and red lie together along the edge, but with a big loop of the red sticking out in the middle of the edge.  Flatten this loop down so that it forms two pleats, one each side of the centre.  The video may help more here than words can.  Pin the pleats in place and sew across the edge using a 1/4″ seam.

Repeat this on three edges of the square.

This will leave you with a pouch formed where the fourth edge is not sewn down.

Fill the pouch with stuffing

Fill the pouch with stuffing

Gather the red edge to fit the blue edge

Gather the red edge to fit the blue edge

Sew a line of gathering stitching across the fourth edge of the red square.  This is just a long running stitch.  Make sure that you leave the ends of the threads trailing.

Take some stuffing and fill the pouch with it.  The more stuffing you use, the more comfy your cushion will be, but don’t overfill the pouch because that will make it difficult to sew the final seam.  It will also be more difficult to sew all the puffs to each other.

Pull the ends of the threads from the gathering stitching to start to gather the red edge up so that you can make it the same length as the blue edge.  Push the stuffing away so that you can sew the gathered red edge to the blue edge.

Sew the two edges together

Sew the two edges together

Make nine puffs

Make nine puffs

Sew the two edges together to complete the first puff.  This isn’t as difficult as it may seem at first.  Use your left hand to flatten the puff so that your sewing machine only has to work on two layers of fabric, not the stuffing as well.

Make nine of these puffs altogether – five red with blue bases and four blue with red bases – and lay them out in three rows of three, alternating red and blue.

Place the puffs with the bases together

Place the puffs with the bases together

How to make a puff quilt – sewing them together

Place two puffs with the bases (the flat sides) together.  Sew them together.  This is a bit more difficult than sewing the final seam on each puff, but just take it slowly and try to flatten the puffs with your left hand as you sew.  Sew the three puffs together across each row and then sew the rows to each other.

The base of the puff quilt cushion

The base of the puff quilt cushion

The reason that I have shown you how to make a puff quilt in this way is that the base of the cushion is now neat and tidy because the seam allowances stick up between the puffs where they are hidden.  That means that at this stage all you have to do is neaten the edges in some way – you don’t need to add another layer of fabric on the base to cover the seams.

I thought long and hard about how to finish the cushion and I considered just putting a zigzag stitch around the edge.  I decided that this wouldn’t look as good as binding, so I used 2″ strips of black fabric and bound the edges just like a normal quilt, even though there are only two layers of fabric at the edge.  I’m pleased that I did, because I think that this gives a more professional finish to the cushion.

I hope that this has helped you to see how to make a puff quilt cushion.  The video may help to show it more clearly:

 

Make Lavender Sunflowers


Make lavender sunflowers

Make lavender sunflowers

I wanted to make lavender sunflowers but my first attempt wasn’t terribly sunflower-like, so I had another attempt after my trip to the lavender farm on Saturday.  This time I am thrilled with the result – in different colours you could make it a daisy or some other similar flower.

Cutting requirements to make lavender sunflowers

All you need for this project is two circles of yellow fabric, about 7″ or 8″ diameter, two smaller circles of brown fabric, about 3″ or 4″ diameter and a small quantity of dried lavender.

Use anything round to cut the circles

Use anything round to cut the circles

Make lavender sunflowers

You can cut the circles with anything round that’s available.  I used a glass for the brown and a small plate for the yellow.  The yellow circles need to be about twice the size of the brown ones.

Place one brown circle with right side down, one yellow with right side down. On these lay one yellow circle with right side up and finally the second brown circle with right side up.  You can feel where the first brown circle is with your fingers so that you can be sure of placing the second one on top of it.

Sew round most of the brown circle

Sew round most of the brown circle

Using a small zigzag (I used stitch width 2 and stitch length 1) sew around the edge of the brown circle, leaving a gap so that you can spoon the lavender in.  I have used white thread so that you can see what I am doing, but obviously I would normally have used brown thread.

Spoon dried lavender in

Spoon dried lavender in

Spoon a small quantity of dried lavender in to the brown circle.  You will have to do this on both sides as the yellow circles separate the two sides of the sunflower.  I couldn’t work out a way to cut the middles of the yellow circles out, so decided to leave them in and have two separate lavender compartments.  Make sure that there is no lavender near the gap in the stitching and then zigzag the open part of the brown circle to close the gap.

Cut the petals from each circle separately

Cut the petals from each circle separately

Cut the petals of the lavender sunflower

I have basically cut triangles from the yellow fabric to make the petals.  I began using pinking shears to give a zigzag edge to the petals but they were too big and clumsy so I changed to a small pair of scissors instead.

Cut the triangles from one side only.  That leaves triangles for the petals. You can see in the photo that the wrong side of the fabric beneath the petals is showing as a lighter colour which gives a good contrast.

Cut the second set of petals

Cut the second set of petals

Now turn the project over and cut triangles from the other yellow circle to make petals.  Try to cut them so that the petals from the second circle lie between the petals of the first circle.  This gives a contrast in both colour and depth to the petals.

I love this project and intend to make lavender sunflowers to hang just about anywhere now!

Here’s the video:

 

Thanks for visiting my blog.

I hope to see you again soon.

Rose

 

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